Family lift veil on murder 70 years ago

Gertrude Canning was 20 years old when she was murdered in 1942

It was the height of World War II and on the shores of Lough Fyne in Scotland, thousands of military personnel formed part of the British war machine. Servicemen and women were drilling for the D-Day landings in the highlands of Inverarary, chosen because it was beyond the reach of the German bombers. One of those was a young 20 year Donegal woman, whose brutal death, not at the hands of the enemy, would haunt future generations of her family. Michele Canning, the great-niece of Gertrude Canning, reports.

The nephew of a woman murdered almost 70 years ago has claimed that he knows who the key suspect is.
Gertrude Canning  from County Donegal was 20 years old when she was shot several times and her body was dumped in a field.
It happened close to the Combined Training Centre, which included HMS Quebec,
where she served in June of 1942. She had left the base to post a letter to her father. It arrived three days before her body was found in a hedge by children.
Ms Canning was a member of the Womens Royal Naval Services (WRN).
Her nephew Liam Canning said he knows the identity of the serviceman suspected of the murder.

Members of the Canning family, who are investigating the murder of their aunt 70 years ago.

“From what has been presented to the family, I could clearly identify who I think is the suspect,” he said.
“Police in Scotland have said that if the case were to come before them now they would solve it.
“The family are not looking for revenge. We have no real malice towards the person that did this.
“When we started this, the primary goal was not about finding a killer, it was about showing respect 70 years on for our aunt,” said Mr Canning.

No plans to remove Northern Ireland’s first ‘Ghost Bike’

Michelle Loughran examines the appearance of ghost bikes in belfast

There are no plans to remove a ghost bike memorial from Belfast’s Ormeau Bridge.

The bike has been placed there in memory of south Belfast cyclist Michael Caulfield who tragically died on April 15 in 2011 as a result of a collision with a lorry.

Alliance councillor for the area Catherine Curran said she personally found the gesture very moving. She said: “The bike has been placed there by the cycling organisation Critical Mass and in terms of raising awareness about safety this is very positive.”

The bike is locked to the bridge’s railings and is close to the spot where the accident happened. It has been painted white and bears the name of the 56-year-old father of four and the date on which he died.

Catherine said any decision to remove the bike lies with either the roads service or the police as the bridge is not a council responsibility.

She said: “There is a technicality about how the bike is fixed to the railings. If it is permanently fixed by a chain it is the property of the Road Service. But if it is by cables then the decision could lie with the police but as far as I am aware there are no plans to remove it.”

A road service spokeswoman said they appreciate the sensitivity of roadside memorials like the ghost bike but stressed that it is important the public are discouraged from erecting roadside memorials for safety reasons.

She said: “Roads Service will investigate any memorials that are considered to cause distraction to the safety of the road user or impact on the operation or safety of the public surface. If Roads Service considers that a roadside memorial should be removed, this will be dealt with in a sensitive manner, where possible.”

Ghost bikes originated in the United States and where first spotted in Saint Louis, Missouri in 2003. They are painted white and serve as a memorial to cyclists who have lost their lives on the road. There are over 500 identified ghost bikes at 180 locations throughout the world but this is the first in Northern Ireland.

Eamon Burns a spokesman for Phoenix Cycling Club in the Ormeau area said he had heard about the ghost bike and thinks it is a great idea to help make motorists more aware of cyclists on the road.

He said: “I did sign-on and timekeeping at a club race back in 2008 when another cyclist Davy McCall was knocked down and killed by a speeding car. I will never forget the evening when that happened.”

Eamon said the following year flowers were laid at the spot in memory of Mr McCall. He said if someone had thought of it a ghost bike would have been a more fitting tribute and reminder of what happened but “perhaps it is still not too late to do that”.

 

 

Invest NI: “A complete failure”

Has Invest NI met its targets? Paul Mullin reports

Liam Gallagher from the Derry trades union council has called Invest Northern Ireland’s strategy for the North West a “complete failure.” It comes just a week after a report by the Northern Ireland Audit Office (NIAO) revealed that Invest NI – the north’s economic development agency – spent less than a quarter of the department’s money in the North West in the last ten years.

Mr Gallagher went on to voice his concerns not just over the figures but how the money that has been given to the North West has been misused. He said: “We allowed a manufacturing base in the North West to simply disappear. Invest NI did nothing absolutely nothing in terms of investment to help maintain the textile industry or help it diversify new markets. We simply accepted that manufacturing was old hat, yesterday’s news and that the way forward was the financial services sector.”

He said that the money has not been spread wisely across the North West and has resulted in the North West being one of the worst affected by the recession. This is backed up by figures released from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) which stated that the claimant count in Northern Ireland was the second highest amongst the twelve UK regions. This is backed even further by a House of Commons study which looked at all 650 parliamentary constituencies and ranked them in terms of unemployment. The Foyle area came third in a league table of UK constituencies worst affected by unemployment.

Mr Gallagher echoed these sentiments: “The reality is that in a population of 107,000 you have an eligible work force of 40,000, of those 24,000 are listed as economically inactive and there are currently 8,600 on the live register. So that gives you an indication of the scale of the problem right now.”

He went onto add that there are less than 3,000 jobs left in the manufacturing industry in Derry, with about in the region of 2,500 financial services jobs, apart from that there is a large part time force working in the retail sector and what he calls a “disproportionate” number of people in public, health and education sectors.

Following the NIAO report many prominent figures in Derry spoke out against Invest NI, including Derry SDLP MLA Colum Eastwood who said: “The report shows proof of devolved government’s failure in terms of jobs in the North West.”

The NIAO report states that just 24% of Invest NI’s overall financial assistance came to the North West since 2002. Other notable figures in the report show that as little as 25.6% of total foreign direct investment (FDI) jobs were in the west of Northern Ireland.

Eastwood went onto say that the report shows Invest Ni’s “long term failure in promoting regional equality in terms of job creation.” He says that the executive leadership now have “to commit to radically change the performance of Invest NI.”

Liam Gallagher thinks that a major source of the problem is what Invest Ni are investing in. “There has been quite a lot of work put into ‘the one plan’ in the North West, were all of the stakeholders, unions, businesses and education sector come together and produced a good analysis of what is required in the North West in terms of high quality jobs. It seems to me that this is where Invest NI should be tying into in terms of research and development.”

The ‘One Plan’ is an ambitious guideline for the regeneration of Derry and was drafted following a huge consultation process across the city. The plan hopes to see an additional £500m in wages and profits in Derry’s economy.  The plan sets out the roles of the public, private and community and voluntary sectors in delivering 12,900 jobs needed to ensure the city is the economic hub of the North West over the next ten years.

The plan describes how the city will be transformed by fundamentally changing the way it does business, and being creative in how organisations and individuals resource and manage themselves.

Mr Gallagher also stressed the importance of getting a solid manufacturing base up and running in the North West again as he said: “You have to have a manufacturing base for your balance of trade, you need to be exporting and growing things. So we need to move away from the financial sector and the heavy reliance on the public sector and start finding markets and find something we can actually export.”

The One Plan is backed throughout the city and although it is seen as ambitious it is seen as achievable. Another scheme, which complements the One Plan, has been set in motion to help combat the economic downturn in the city also. A five point plan has been put in place to try and save Derry City Centre.

Central to the plan is to create a city centre enterprise zone to give independent retailers a helping hand. On the proviso that the executive grants the status, it would mean that businesses in Derry city centre could avail of rates holidays, faster planning decisions and capital allowances to promote new retail and business developments. The other four proposals include the creation of a comprehensive retail development strategy for the city centre; the adoption of a ‘town centre’ first planning policy when considering out of town retail applications; the launching of a shop independent campaign and to increase the amount of affordable parking facilities and public transport in the city centre.

There are more that 130 vacant shops in the city centre, 50 of which have been recent closures. This combined with applications for nine out of town superstores means concern for local business people. It adds weight to the claims made by Mr Gallagher and Colum Eastwood that Invest NI’s strategy in the North West has been a failure and it’s an argument that will continue to run between those in the North West and the decision makers in Stormont.

http://www.investni.com/

http://www.councillor.info/derry/ceastwood/0/Default.aspx

http://www.ictu.ie/about/affiliates/tradescouncils/

North Coast derelict buildings set for brighter future

By NATASHA MILLAR
The Metropole Portrush was destroyed in a fire in 2009

Derelict properties in Portrush and Portstewart could get a facelift under plans revealed at Stormont on Tuesday.The buildings have caused concern within the community and one local councillor believes profit seeking at the height of the boom is behind the problem.

DUP Councillor Norman Hillis says the derelict buildings which have blighted the seaside resorts are due to “developer greed”. Mr Hillis, a prominent businessman in Portrush, said many of these properties where purchased at the height of the market and the owners now have no cash to improve their appearance.

“Sadly the result of this, is that important key sites are now dragging both towns down and are a source of widespread criticism throughout Northern Ireland,” said Councillor Hillis. “I do feel that these sites are an embarrassment to us all.” Councillor Hillis’ comments come just a day after the Environment Minister signalled a cash injection could be provided to give local councils the power to deal with such properties.

Speaking to the Assembly on Tuesday, Alex Attwood said he would consider funding a scheme to improve the appearance of buildings which have been abandoned by developers in the property crash. At present neither the Executive nor local councils have the power to make these sites safe or improve their appearance.

Councillor Hillis welcomed the possible cash boost from the Executive, which could provide a short term solution. “There is great need for action in Portrush and Portstewart as both towns are suffering from the result of what I call developer greed,” said Councillor Hillis. “A cash injection to sort this out this mess to my mind would prove a huge success”.

With major international events on the horizon for the North Coast, such as the Irish Open, the North West 200 and the International Airshow, a possible face lift for the area has met widespread praise from residents and councillors. Independent Councillor Christine Alexander described the situation as an ‘enormous problem’ on the coastal fringes of the Coleraine Borough. She said it was a constant cause of complaint for her constituents and she was “delighted” at any plans to improve their appearance.

Councillor Alexander was instrumental in starting a scheme which last year raised in excess of £30,000 and painted over 40 derelict buildings. The voluntary scheme was funded entirely by local residents and businesses, including a cash donation from US Open champion Graeme McDowell.

“We have just commenced a similar project to continue to ‘Paint Portrush’ this year and hope the Minister’s announcement will complement this,” said Councillor Alexander.

From pretty woman to wicked witch

Review by Niamh Ferguson

 

Julia Roberts stars as the evil Queen Clementianna in Mirror Mirror, a new adaptation of the original fairy tale Snow White by the Brothers Grimm. At first glance it is easy to draw comparisons with Disney’s 1937 Snow White, however director Tarsem Singh has added his own twist to this well loved tale.

The story is retold through the eyes of the wicked queen and she states that this is her story and not Snow White’s. Julia Roberts’ portrayal of the antagonist is entertaining yet at times very sinister. The “magic mirror” is not in the traditional style but appears as a portal to another realm which represents her madness and cruelty towards her step daughter, Snow White (Lily Collins). It appears to be a denial of the Queen’s own conscience; “I am after all merely a reflection of you”.

The film retains the original concept of the classic tale – the Queen blinded by her vanity orders her beautiful step daughter to be killed, she escapes, finds her way to seven dwarves and meets a handsome prince (Armie Hammer).

The movie touches on the same motifs as the original narrative. There is a kiss that will break a spell, a poisoned apple and an enchanted mirror, yet they could have been utilised better to add to the overall plot. At times, it seems they have been included only because these elements are what one would expect to see in a retelling of Snow White.

Interestingly, the dwarves are not miners but thieves having turned to crime due to the corruption of the kingdom by Queen Clementianna. There are some fun references to the Disney classic, particularly when one dwarf notes: “it’s better than working down a mine.”

Mirror Mirror retains a “fairy tale” atmosphere with outlandish costumes, beautiful scenery and childlike humour yet while the presentation is near flawless the execution doesn’t hit the mark as much as one would expect.

Mirror Mirror has all the key ingredients for the classic story; apples, magic and a true love’s first kiss, yet it appears that Tarsem Singh has wanted to give it his own flavour but has not been able to fully divert from the original narrative, relying on it when things get slow.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgbH05rQx1s

 

The new Cathedral Quarter

By Niamh Ferguson

Yesterday saw the opening of the MAC theatre in Belfast’s Cathedral Quarter. The Metropolitan Arts Centre, or MAC, contains two theatres and three art galleries as well as a rehearsal space and dance studio. This new complex will bring a lot to the area but will it enhance or detract from the smaller clubs and performance spaces within this tightly knit and long-established artistic pocket of the city?

I spoke to Graeme Watson, founder of Big Laughs, Belfast. He said: “I think the MAC, and particularly the incredible plaza around it, St Anne’s Square, will make the Cathedral Quarter one of the most exciting and hopefully buzzing parts of Belfast.”

With so many state of the art facilities in one building at the heart of the artistic Cathedral Quarter, some have concerns that it may push out smaller independent venues in the area, or turn out to be a flop itself. However, with a wide range of events scheduled until the end of the year, the MAC looks set to bring a diverse selection of art and entertainment to Belfast, some hoping that it will benefit all the surrounding bars, venues, and restaurants.

Graeme runs comedy nights in and around the area, particularly in the Black Box. I asked him whether he thought the MAC would detract from the smaller performance spaces in the area but he said:  “The MAC feels like a much more formal venue, a very middle class arts space, while I think the Black Box has its roots in a more bohemian, alternative and counter-culture kind of arts scene. I think they can both co-exist happily.”

Some famous faces have already been booked to perform in the MAC. Diarmuid Corr (BBC’s Sketchy) is set to appear in June under the Big Laughs’ name. Graeme hopes this will be great for his company as well as the theatre.  “I’m excited that the Diarmuid Corr show will be the first stand-up comedy gig in the MAC as well. That feels special, especially as I’m sure the MAC will probably be a hot tourist attraction for the next 30 years.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak26deGUsy0&feature=relmfu

 

Caberet restaurant Teatro serves up a real treat

 

Last week was unseasonably warm for the end of March and the heat seemingly affected the other half as he suggested taking me out for dinner.

Feeling a bit adventurous I decided we should try Teatro on Botanic Avenue, Belfast’s first cabaret restaurant.

Teatro has a real bohemian feel, from its vintage inspired furniture to the chequered floor.

A Spanish guitarist serenaded diners from a small stage, and the front bay window lit with white fairy lights hid Belfast and transported us to a café in Madrid.

The Mediterranean influenced menu includes European and Marrakech inspired dishes, although we returned to Belfast when we realised the surroundings might be cafe chic but the prices were fine dining.

Starters and tapas ranged from £5.85 to £8.00, we ordered the chorizo in red wine with crusty bread and the Spanish omelette with peppers and potato to share.

The limited choice of main courses consisted of six dishes; a lamb, chicken, fish, steak, pasta of the day and veggie option, ranging from £11.95 to £19.95. Side orders were priced separately at £3.95 each.

I choose the spiced cod with lemon, caper and alioli sauce and skinny fries and the other half had the lamb kafta, with couscous and pita bread.

Next was the obligatory bottle of wine poured into old fashioned glass goblets, we settled for the house white but a healthy selection was on offer.

Mismatched flowery side plates not unlike those displayed in granny’s china cabinet dressed the table. Salt and pepper were absent, a bold statement indeed but when the food arrived it needed nothing more.

The chorizo was crisp and the strong flavour of paprika left a lingering smoky taste which the red wine did not over power. The sliced potato and sweet peppers infused with a chilli kick elevated the humble egg in the Spanish omelette to grand heights.

The wait between courses was substantial but it was worthwhile. A spicy batter gave the soft cod a real heat and when coupled with the almost metallic and bitter taste of the sauce was a marriage made in the mouth.

In that moment I understood why Masterchef’s Gregg Wallace salivates with his eyes closed over perfectly balanced food.

The lamb meatballs were well seasoned and came with two dipping sauces, one mint and the other tomato and roasted red pepper.

I promised we would only examine the dessert menu for the purposes of this review. However the churros con chocolate were impossible to resist but at a pricey £6.50 each, one was enough.

These Spanish donuts served with a dark chocolate sauce were crispy on the outside with a spongy centre that did not disappoint.

As a dining experience Teatro is intimate and relaxed but service is slow and the tables are close together. The guitarist only played for 20 minutes and although expensive, the quality of the food adequately outshone any cabaret performance he could have offered.

For more information on Teatro visit http://www.viewbelfast.co.uk/restaurants/teatro-info-67086.html or for other Belfast restaurants http://www.gotobelfast.com/

Reviewer Michelle Loughran

Call for block on suicide internet searches

Jordan Moates considers the need to block internet suicide websites

The government should block internet searches for methods of suicide northern Ireland MP Willie McCrea has said. Mr McCrea was speaking as he introduced a 10 minute rule bill in Westminster.

Mr McCrea said the thrust of his bill was to “gain help for those who feel suicidal and are vulnerable to the influences of others. There is a need for change in public attitudes. For too long the subject has been hidden. We need openness and must do everything we can to prevent suicide”.

Speaking of the Internet Mr McCrea said many turn to it “to seek the comfort and guidance that they cannot find in their daily lives”. However, whilst the internet must be recognised as an important resource in society, we must be mindful that there are websites and chat rooms which can encourage the vulnerable

Mr McCrea has proposed that: “A gatekeeper or guardian should be in place to monitor websites having the power to forward the information onto the appropriate authorities with a view to having the website closed down.  A complaints procedure should also be in place”.

Suicide prevention charity PAPYRUS has applauded William McCrea for “highlighting the dangers of suicide”.

Chief Executive of PAPYRUS, Jed Flynn, said: “Sometimes when a young person goes onto a search engine to look for help the first thing they get is on method. We want them to go onto a search engine and get help”.

He says that internet providers suggest they are “largely the conduit through which information passes and that absolves them from responsibility of what is written”.

The charity has said it is “aware of more than fifty young suicides where the internet is believed to have played a significant part. This could only be the tip of an iceberg, with further deaths that have not been reported”.

Mr Flynn said that the likes of facebook and twitter need to be used “positively and creatively”.

Latest figures released have shown that the number of suicides in Northern Ireland has more than doubled during the period 2003 -2010. In 2003 there were 144 suicides compared to 313 in 2010.  The figures also show that males are three times more likely to take their own lives than females.

Speaking about tackling the suicide rate Mr Flynn said: “Governments can do so much but what we need to do is crack into the general public. We need to start talking about suicide, it’s not a specialist subject it’s very human”.

Full interview with Je Flynn, Chief Executive of PAPYRUS

 

Your time, our place. Your money?

By Niamh Ferguson

This year, Belfast looks set to become a major tourist destination with the launch of “ni2012.” This campaign introduced by the Northern Ireland Tourist Board is dedicated to showing what Northern Ireland can offer on a world stage level.

With the Titanic centenary celebrations, the return of the Irish Open to Royal Portrush and many other exciting events scheduled throughout the year, the “ni2012” campaign is expected to boost the number of visitors to the country.

Arlene Foster, Minster for the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment, has claimed: “This is the time to welcome the world to our place and show them why we’re proud of it.” The Northern Ireland Executive is committed to bringing tourism to the country and many of these attractions and events are publicly funded.

Receiving much media coverage, Titanic Belfast opened its doors earlier in the year to coincide with the centenary of the ship’s sinking, creating a buzz throughout the city and gaining much attention from overseas. Many visitors were met with disappointment during the initial weeks of opening to discover that tickets were sold out until April 16 however, with the 100th year landmark now passed and the attraction inevitably no longer selling out for days at a time, will the considerable sum of public money spent on its construction (£60 million) be seen as a worthy investment in years to come?

On this issue, I spoke to Minister of Finance, Sammy Wilson: “On the general point I believe that there is considerable scope for development of the Northern Ireland economy through events which promote tourism either appealing to the home market or to the foreign market.

“Obviously events like the Irish Open and Titanic which are very strong worldwide brands have huge potential to bring in people from outside Northern Ireland and to result in considerable expenditure in the Northern Ireland economy creating jobs and increasing our GDP.

“For these reasons the Northern Ireland Executive have decided to put some public money into the Titanic Signature Project and also the promotion of the Irish Open. I believe that money will create a return which will show it to be a worthwhile investment.”

According to The Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment, in 2011 1.8 million tourists visited Northern Ireland, generating £368 million in revenue, an increase of 20% compared to 2010. With more reasons to visit Northern Ireland in “our year”, it is not unreasonable to assume that the quantity of tourists and revenue may increase, however will the initial investments be sustainable beyond 2012?

The Titanic building has been described as Northern Ireland’s Eiffel Tower or Guggenheim museum and Claire Bradshaw, the centre’s marketing manager maintains that Titanic Belfast will be appealing to visitors, even after the centenary celebrations have finished. “What we say is come down, go through the experience and I promise you will not be disappointed.”

The project is being funded in part by the Department of Enterprise and Belfast City Council as well as the Belfast Harbour Commission and Titanic Quarter Ltd. The £92 million which is being spent on the “experience” is not only the iconic building but on opening the Harland and Wolff drawing offices to the public and the renovation of the SS Nomadic, serving as extra attractions for tourists. It has been suggested that the centre needs 290,000 visitors a year just to break even. It is hoped that all these extra attractions will increase numbers and revenue.

It is not only the Titanic Signature Project which has created interest in the country. Royal Portrush Golf Club is set to host the Irish Open for the first time since 1947 at the end of June. The prize for winning this event will be €2 million and the Northern Ireland Executive is expected to give a minimum of £2 million to this cause. With tickets selling fast and golf fans set to visit from all over the world surely this investment will be worth it.

I spoke to the professional of the club, Gary McNeill, about what he thinks the event will do for the North Coast.

“The Irish Open will do a lot of promoting for the area and for Royal Portrush. It’s our chance to showcase the area; it’ll bring tourists in not just this year or next year but I imagine for the next ten years. We have inquiries coming in everyday from across the water and I know a lot of people will be coming from England, Scotland and Wales. There will be a lot coming up from the Republic of Ireland. Just from the sounds of things and by ticket sales already I’d say most of Northern Ireland will be here as well.”

This is a one off event, which may return to the famous golf club in the coming years. It will be up to the North Coast to indeed showcase itself as a reason for people to visit.

With Derry adopting the title of “UK City of Culture” next year, and with Belfast continuing its popular annual events such as The Cathedral Quarter Arts Festival, the internationally acclaimed Festival of Fools and Queen’s Belfast Festival amongst others in 2013, we may see tourists visiting the attractions and venues that made 2012 “your time” and “our place”.

Follow the #ni2012 campaign on Twitter – www.twitter.com/DiscoverNI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhOEkN7ZTIc

 

 

Hungry for More

The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games has been the film of 2012, as much for the controversy surrounding it as its box office success. As teen movies go this is perhaps the most challenging and thought provoking.

The film is based on a Suzanne Collins novel of the same name. It takes place in a dystopian future, in a nation that consists of one wealthy capital surrounded by twelve poorer districts. Each year a boy and a girl between the ages of 12 and 18 are picked to take part in the hunger games, a televised fight to the death were only one participant can survive.

The action follows 16 year old Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence), who volunteers for the games to spare her younger sister. She is joined from her district by Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson), a baker’s son. They both come under the tutelage of Haymitch (Woody Harrelson), a former winner of the games, who has developed a drink problem.

The film is rated a 12A in theUK, meaning anyone under 12 can watch it, if accompanied by an adult. The themes of the film are dark, over the two and half hour duration there is no comic relief. There is however 22 under 18s being stabbed, shot, stung or mauled to death, while a wealthy population of the capital watch with detached amusement. It’s hard to think who decided this was suitable for under 12’s.

Suzanne Collins wrote the book as a commentary on reality TV shows, and how they manipulate people for the holy grail- big ratings. The strength of such a commentary is based on the main character, Katniss, who almost is alone in the realisation that the games are morally wrong and should be challenged.

Jennifer Lawrence, is the undoubted star of the show. She is a true silver screen heroine, in the style of Sigourney Weaver’s Ripley in Alien. Wisdom, strength and courage beyond her years make her character important and memorable. Not many actresses could so easily or convincingly balance the physical demands of being a rough, ready and ruthless warrior with the beautiful and tender scene when Katniss holds and sings to a dying comrade.

Josh Hutchinson as Peeta is fine in a performance that could have been delivered by any blue eyed, blonde haired, fit, young male. The character of Peeta is eager and likable, indeed he is also important. But he seems to reach the climax of the games by luck, and the potential romance between him and Katniss doesn’t seem believable.

Jennifer Lawrence and the effortlessly cool Woody Harrelson deliver fine central performances that make the long running time seem worthwhile.  It’s smart, serious and genuinely exciting. Its themes and overall production are closer to Twilight than Harry Potter. However, in reality it is vastly superior than both those franchises.

See The Hunger Games Trailer here.

Review by Aidan McKay